BOOKS

Research on Waldorf Graduates in North America, Phase 1 - eBook

 
Title:      Research on Waldorf Graduates in North America, Phase 1 - eBook
Categories:      eBooks, High School, Waldorf Graduate Research, Research, Evaluation/Assessment, General Waldorf Education
BookID:      466
Authors:      Faith Baldwin, Douglas Gerwin, David Mitchell
ISBN-10(13):      none
Publisher:      Research Institute for Waldorf Edcation
Publication date:      2005
Number of pages:      51
Language:      English
Rating:      0 
Picture:      cover
Ebook:      Download ebook1.pdf
Description:     

Waldorf education is designed to provide its students with broad skill sets and a wide range of interests, giving them many options in life and allowing them to find fulfilling vocations. Seventy-five years after the founding of the first Waldorf school in the United States and with the tremendous growth of Waldorf schools
across the country, it is time to look in a systematic way at what happens to Waldorf graduates:
How many go on to college?
Which colleges accept Waldorf graduates, and to which colleges do they choose to go?
How many do not go directly to college, and what do they do instead?

This first phase in a two-part survey examined these questions by gathering data collected in 2004–2005 in the United States and Canada from twenty-seven Waldorf high schools reporting on what their graduates from the past ten years did in the year following graduation. Phase Two will look at career choices, how
Waldorf graduates are perceived by their professors and employers, and how well Waldorf education prepared them for life and the challenges of today’s world. Both phases of this survey will be useful to enrollment coordinators, marketing/outreach directors, college counselors, parents deciding where to enroll
their children, and students graduating from Waldorf schools across the country.

The results of the first phase of this survey show that the vast majority of Waldorf graduates go to an enormous range of colleges and universities. Some take a year off to explore the world or, go directly into a trade that feels meaningful to them. These results suggest that Waldorf education does in fact produce freethinking
individuals with a broad range of interests.

See also Survey of Waldorf Graduates, Phase 2: Survey of Waldorf Graduates, Phase 3

Please past text to modal